• Dr. Meghna Dassani, DMD
  • Sep 13, 23

98. A Breath of Fresh Air: Early Detection and Management of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

"Parents and healthcare providers need to take pediatric OSA seriously. But they should also know that the condition is highly manageable with the right treatment. Diagnosing pediatric OSA typically involves a comprehensive sleep study called polysomnography. This test monitors several physiological parameters during sleep, including brain waves, heart rate, oxygen levels, and respiratory patterns."

Quality sleep is vital for children’s healthy growth and development. Unfortunately, some children have trouble achieving restful sleep due to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a common sleep disorder affecting between 1.2% and 5.7% of children of all ages.

Early detection and effective management of pediatric sleep apnea are important to ensure children can breathe freely and get the rest they need. Left untreated, pediatric OSA can have serious consequences, including:

 

  • Impaired growth and cognitive development
  • Learning difficulties
  • Cardiovascular problems, like hypertension
  • Behavioral issues
  • Increased risk of accidents due to excessive daytime sleepiness

What Is Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

Pediatric OSA is characterized by a partial or complete blockage of the upper airway during sleep. It results in repeated episodes of interrupted breathing, leading to brief periods of breathing cessation (apnea) or shallow breathing (hypopnea). These episodes can occur multiple times during the night and last for several seconds to minutes.

Airway obstruction typically occurs when the muscles at the back of the throat relax excessively, causing the soft tissues, such as the tonsils or adenoids, to collapse and block the airway. This can lead to reduced oxygen levels in the blood and disrupted sleep patterns. Pediatric OSA often arises from the following:

  • Enlarged tonsils or adenoids
  • Obesity
  • Structural abnormalities, such as a tongue tie, narrow airway, or cleft palate

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of pediatric OSA is important for early detection and intervention.

One of the primary indications of pediatric OSA is persistent and loud snoring. Occasional snoring is normal. However, chronic and intense snoring in children should raise concerns for parents.

Other symptoms to watch out for include:

  • Restless sleep
  • Gasping or choking during sleep
  • Bedwetting
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Mouth breathing
  • Morning headaches

If parents observe these signs, they should talk to a healthcare professional and ask for a sleep evaluation.

How to diagnose pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

Parents and healthcare providers need to take pediatric OSA seriously. But they should also know that the condition is highly manageable with the right treatment. Diagnosing pediatric OSA typically involves a comprehensive sleep study called polysomnography. This test monitors several physiological parameters during sleep, including brain waves, heart rate, oxygen levels, and respiratory patterns. A sleep study helps determine the severity and underlying causes of obstructive sleep apnea, enabling the development of an appropriate treatment plan.

Treatment options for children with OSA

The management of pediatric OSA may involve several approaches, depending on the child’s specific needs.

In cases where enlarged tonsils or adenoids are identified as the primary cause, doctors may recommend surgical intervention through an adenotonsillectomy. This is the most common way to treat pediatric OSA. The procedure removes the airway obstruction, allowing for improved airflow and a reduction of sleep apnea symptoms.

Some children have structural abnormalities, like a tongue tie or narrow airway, that can lead to OSA. In these cases, doctors may suggest a tongue release, also known as frenuloplasty, or the use of expanders to widen the upper jaw.

For children with persistent sleep apnea or underlying factors, like obesity, additional interventions may be necessary. Lifestyle modifications, such as weight management programs, regular exercise, and a healthy diet can reduce the severity of sleep apnea.

In some instances, doctors may prescribe continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. CPAP involves wearing a mask during sleep that delivers a gentle flow of air. It ensures that children’s airways remain open and unobstructed.

Creating an optimal sleep environment is also important for children with OSA. Establishing consistent bedtime routines, creating a comfortable sleep space, and promoting good sleep hygiene all contributes to a better sleep quality. Limiting screen time before bedtime and maintaining a regular sleep schedule also improves sleep patterns.

Parents should follow up regularly with healthcare providers to monitor the effectiveness of their child’s treatment and make any necessary changes. Open communication with children about their sleep experiences and any changes in symptoms is also important. Parents who provide emotional support and reassurance can help children cope with managing their sleep apnea.

Dr. Meghna Dassani has practiced dentistry for over two decades and is passionate about the role dentists play in whole-body health. She earned her DMD at Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine and opened Dassani Dentistry in Houston, TX in 2011. You can learn more on her website: MeghnaDassani.com.